Urban Anatomy

www.urbananatomy.se by David Molander, 2012.

Happy Halloween

Facetracking experiment. Daito Manabe, born in 1976. Graduated from the Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, and Dynamic Sensory Programming Course at International Academy of Media Arts and Sciences (IAMAS). He participated in various projects that made use of his programming skills, across a range of genres and fields. He also devotes his energies to educational activities such as workshops in various countries, including at MIT Media Lab and Fabrica.

Dead Drops

‘Dead Drops’ is an anonymous, offline, peer to peer file-sharing network in public space. USB flash drives are embedded into walls, buildings and curbs accessible to anybody in public space. Everyone is invited to drop or find files on a dead drop. Plug your laptop to a wall, house or pole to share your favorite files and data. Each dead drop is installed empty except a readme.txt file explaining the project. ‘Dead Drops’ is open to participation.

Aram Bartholl, 2010

Map

The project ‘Map’ is a public space installation questioning the red map marker of the location based search engine Google Maps. “Find local businesses, view maps and get driving directions in Google Maps.” With a small graphic icon Google marks search results in the map interface. The design of the virtual map pin seems to be derived from a physical map needle. On one hand the marker and information speech bubble next to it cast a shadow on the digital map as if they were physical objects. When the map is switched to satellite mode it seems that they become part of the city. On the other hand it is a simple 20 px graphic icon which stays always at the same size on the computer screen. The size of the life size red marker in physical space corresponds to the size of a marker in the web interface in maximal zoom factor of the map. Where is the center of a city?

In the city center series ‘Map’ is set up at the exact spot where Google Maps assumes to be the city center of the city. Transferred to physical space the map marker questions the relation of the digital information space to every day life public city space. The perception of the city is increasingly influenced by geolocation services.

Aram Bartholl, 2006-2011

How to make code into art

Germany’s Chaos Computer Club published the sourcecode for a piece of malware used by the German government to spy on citizens. The software was discovered in the wild and reverse engineered. It can be used to spy on or control remote PCs. Because of flaws in the software, anyone who was infected with this by German police was vulnerable to spying by “anyone on the street.” The German supreme court banned the use of trojans to spy on German citizens in 2008.

The code was later published in the newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine.

Aram Bartholl, 2008

directionstolastvisitor.com

directionstolastvisitor.com, 2011 by Charles Broskoski.

CO2RSET

CO2RSET is a chic wearable that has a CO2 sensor and ten mini gear motors that run down the spine and tighten or loosen the bodice in response to air quality. Following the vein of computational garment design, CO2RSET integrates technology into the design, adhering to its normal aesthetic and pattern of use in contemporary fashion. Using the corset provides a form capable of asserting influence over the wearers breath to provide a visceral reminder and bring awareness to the quality of air they are breathing on an intimate scale.

Kristin O’Friel, 2008

Murmur Study

Murmur Study is an installation that examines the rise of micro-messaging technologies such as Twitter and Facebook’s status update. One might describe these messages as a kind of digital small talk. But unlike water-cooler conversations, these fleeting thoughts are accumulated, archived and digitally-indexed by corporations. While the future of these archives remains to be seen, the sheer volume of publicly accessible personal — often emotional — expression should give us pause.

This installation consists of 30 thermal printers that continuously monitor Twitter for new messages containing variations on common emotional utterances. Messages containing hundreds of variations on words such as argh, meh, grrrr, oooo, ewww, and hmph, are printed as an endless waterfall of text accumulating in tangled piles below.

The printed thermal receipt paper is then reused in future projects and exhibitions or recycled.

Christopher Baker, 2011

Lake Como Remix

The Museum of Glitch Aesthetics (MOGA) features the work of The Artist 2.0, an online persona whose personal mythology and body of digital artworks are rapidly being canonized into the annals of art history. The MOGA narrative traces the life of the artist and his ongoing commitment to a practice of ‘glitch aesthetics’ that leads to the museum of the title. MOGA features a wide array of artworks intentionally corrupted by technological processes including net art, digital video art, digitally manipulated still images, game design, stand-up comedy, sound art, and electronic literature. The project also includes a museum catalog available in both free e-book and print-on-demand editions. For more information, visit glitchmuseum.com

MOGA is directed by artist Mark Amerika.

levelHead

levelHead, a spatial memory game, developed by Julian Oliver in 2008, uses a hand-held solid-plastic cube as its only interface. On-screen it appears each face of the cube contains a little room, each of which are logically connected by doors.

In one of these rooms is a character. By tilting the cube the player directs this character from room to room in an effort to find the exit.

Some doors lead nowhere and will send the character back to the room they started in, a trick designed to challenge the player’s spatial memory. Which doors belong to which rooms?

There are three cubes (levels) in total, each of which are connected by a single door. Players have the goal of moving the character from room to room, cube to cube in an attempt to find the final exit door of all three cubes. If this door is found the character will appear to leave the cube, walk across the table surface and vanish.. The game then begins again.

Someone once said levelHead may have something to do with a story from Borges.. For a description of the conceptual basis of this project, see below.

Newstweek

“Newstweek” by Julian Oliver (NZ) and Danja Vasiliev (RU) is a device for manipulating news read by other people on wireless hotspots. Built into a small and innocuous wall plug, the Newstweek device appears part of the local infrastructure, allowing writers to remotely edit news read on wireless devices without the awareness of their users.

While news is increasingly read digitally, it still follows a top-down distribution model and thus often falls victim to the same political and corporate interests that have always sought to manipulate public opinion.

Newstweek also signals a word of caution, that a strictly media-defined reality is a vulnerable reality; that along the course of news distribution there are many hands at work, from ISP workers, numerous server administrators and wireless access point owners.

Vibrator

“The beauty of feelings, ideas, curves of bodies. Global, anonymous and mass interest in pornography on the network led me to concentrate in my work on the pleasure and beauty for one person. The object is connected to the busiest porno server in the world. It vibrates and lights up based on the increases or decreases of the viewership of the most requested video sequences. The anonymous interest of the mass of users from the entire world is thus concentrated into an object for one. Roughly every several dozen seconds, the object gets new information and changes its activity. If the viewership increased briskly, then the vibrator pulses upwards (fade in) more than in the case of a smaller growth of viewership. In the event of a decline of viewership, the object then pulses downwards (fade out), from slow to even slower intervals. When one holds a small button at the end of the device, the object is active according to the previous measurement, thus making it possible to compare the development of viewership.”

Prokop Bartonicek, 2011

LED Olympic costumes

“as part of the olympic closing ceremony, german designer moritz waldemeyer conceived a vibrant collection of LED-embedded
carnival costumes for the olympic hand over to rio de janeiro – proudly honoring all things brazilian.

working with brazilian fashion designer jum nakao, waldemeyer produced an ecletic selection
of 140 LED-encrusted carnival ensembles that pulse to the rhythm of the music. the pieces were specifically created to complement four different performances: an eighty-piece drum parade, brazilian samba girls, amazonian folk dancers, and maracatu – a customary ceremonial dance staged in celebration of electing the kings of congo.

the display was layered with a fusion of culture and technology – the samba maidens harnessing glowing spinning ferris wheels;
each drummer armed with a replica of their respective instruments suspended above them, rippling with concentric circles of light; the amazonians dripping with illuminated jewelry; and the maracatu donned in a mesh of LEDs resembling light bulbs,
referencing favela festivities, and accompanied by floor-length headdresses adorned with illuminated ribbon.

waldmeyer says of the energetic display:

‘we wanted to root our creations in brazilian culture and history but with a twist. the jewellery is actually made up of electronics equipment – circuit boards and cables – and even drinking straws, a reference to grassroots creativity.

finding spheres of the right size and diffusion to make the LEDs look like light bulbs was actually one of our biggest challenges.
we eventually found the solution in containers used by the water treatment industry!’

waldemeyer also explored new territories regarding LED programming. usually the costumes would be individually controlled by battery, however, for the first time, waldemeer synchronized the LEDs’ animation to all beat to the drums. he did this by employing the available olympic radio network, and created a system where the costumes respond the tempo of the music so that
they are all perfectly in time.”

as written by designboom.com about Moritz Waldemeyer, 2012

Immaterials: Light painting WiFi

The city is filled with an invisible landscape of networks that is becoming an interwoven part of daily life. WiFi networks and increasingly sophisticated mobile phones are starting to influence how urban environments are experienced and understood. We want to explore and reveal what the immaterial terrain of WiFi looks like and how it relates to the city.

Timo Arnall, Jørn Knutsen and Einar Sneve Martinussen, 2011

The Transfinite by Ryoji Ikeda

Since the mid-1990s, Ryoji Ikeda (born 1966, lives in Paris) has been among the foremost international composers and artists in the realm of cutting-edge digital technologies and their integration into visual and acoustic presentations. His works are based on spatiotemporal compositions in which the musical and visual material is reduced to a minimum: sine waves, sound pulses, pixels of light and numerical data. He investigates sound, time and space on the basis of mathematical methods and transforms them in his concerts and installations into an intense experience for the audience.

Score Light by Daito Manabe

Born in 1976. Graduated from the Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, and Dynamic Sensory Programming Course at International Academy of Media Arts and Sciences (IAMAS). He participated in various projects that made use of his programming skills, across a range of genres and fields. He also devotes his energies to educational activities such as workshops in various countries, including at MIT Media Lab and Fabrica. In addition, he has participated as a presenter in the openFrameworks Developer Meeting and at cycling ’74 Expo.

Sweat on Retina by Britta Thie

Britta Thie knows well the way a seduction goes in today’s media from her own modeling experience, but she interprets it uncompromisingly as an artist. Her video Shooting intentionally parodies the artificial exaltation of the collaboration between a professional photographer and his model. Thie is performing in a double role: she is both dominant and voluntary predator and the object of oppression. That shows the inside anatomy of the often absurdly affected machinery of mass media and advertising. Her other video named “Hi, HD” shows nostalgic memories of her own carefree childlike homevideo imitations, confronted with the author’s maturity and current technologies. (Pavel Vančát)

Sweat on Retina by Britta Thie

Britta Thie knows well the way a seduction goes in today’s media from her own modeling experience, but she interprets it uncompromisingly as an artist. Her video Shooting intentionally parodies the artificial exaltation of the collaboration between a professional photographer and his model. Thie is performing in a double role: she is both dominant and voluntary predator and the object of oppression. That shows the inside anatomy of the often absurdly affected machinery of mass media and advertising. Her other video named “Hi, HD” shows nostalgic memories of her own carefree childlike homevideo imitations, confronted with the author’s maturity and current technologies. (Pavel Vančát)

Sweat on Retina by Britta Thie

Britta Thie knows well the way a seduction goes in today’s media from her own modeling experience, but she interprets it uncompromisingly as an artist. Her video Shooting intentionally parodies the artificial exaltation of the collaboration between a professional photographer and his model. Thie is performing in a double role: she is both dominant and voluntary predator and the object of oppression. That shows the inside anatomy of the often absurdly affected machinery of mass media and advertising. Her other video named “Hi, HD” shows nostalgic memories of her own carefree childlike homevideo imitations, confronted with the author’s maturity and current technologies. (Pavel Vančát)

Fire with Fire (2010)

Isabelle Hayeur is an image-based artist, born in Montreal in 1969. She is mostly known for her large-size photomontages, her videos, and her site-specific installations.

3 channels video installation.
Video projection of 15 minutes playing in continuous loop.
3 Blu-ray players, 3 video projectors.

112 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.

Noise, 2010, Yoshi Sodeoka

Yoshi Sodeoka is a multidisciplinary artist and musician based in New York City. Over the past decade, his videos have been featured in exhibitions across the world (New York city’s Deitch Projects, Scope Art Fair, Monkeytown, London’s OneDotZero, Portland’s Floating World Animation Fest, Boston’s Lumen Eclipse, Barcelona’s Sonar Festival, Haifa museum Israel, San Sebastian’s GlasKultur, The Creative Time Holiday Light Show at New York’s Grand Central Terminal, Berlin’s Transmediale, Poland’s Krakow Film Festival, WNET Reel NY). Sodeoka has received grants from the likes of the Greenwall foundation and his work is part of the permanent collections of the San Francisco MoMA and New York’s Museum of the Moving Image.

The Chrystal Gallery

In 2010 the virtual exhibition space The Chrystal Gallery teamed up with Gentili Apri to present Exhibition One, a computer rendered group show with works by Kari Altmann, Charles Broskoski, Lindsay Lawson, Billy Rennekamp, Maxwell Simmer, and Harm Van Den Dorpel – curated and rendered by Timur Si-Qin.

Extracting a parallel instance of the work as a three-dimensional representation of geometric data, Exhibition One offered an opportunity to present an alternate framework that posits the questions: Where does an artwork stop and its documentation begin? What is the function of a prospective image that is decisively not-a-model?

(Featured image: “FTW”, Billy Rennekamp, 2010)

LSR 1.0

by Johan Holm, 2012.